• Novalja ideal tourist town for entertainment and rest Zrće a place for wild parties
  • Novalja ideal tourist town for entertainment and rest Zrće a place for wild parties
  • Novalja ideal tourist town for entertainment and rest Zrće a place for wild parties
  • Novalja ideal tourist town for entertainment and rest Zrće a place for wild parties

Culture And Entertainment

Novalja has a long and rich history as evidenced by the numerous remains of ancient buildings in the town and its surroundings.

The name Novalja comes from the Latin word navalia. In ancient times the word navalia was used for the place where ships were pulled out on land and repaired or stored in a specially built repository.

The city has numerous archaeological sites such as the Roman over the northern part of the city, leading to Luna. An interesting site is the current church Mala Crikva in the very center of the site, on the place where there used to be large town basilica and even today one can see the remains of its beautiful mosaic floor. Within the town area can be seen the remains of two other basilicas, one located in the Vrtić region, and the other in the Gaja territory.

During the following decades, many rulers reigned the Island of Pag, from the Republic of Venice over Napoleon to Austria in the 19th century. In the late 19th century Croatian became the official language, Novalja started to blossom and first signs of tourism could be seen.

The Stomorica collection is an extensive collection of fragments of church furniture and various other stone or ceramic items.

The City Museum in Novalja keeps a large part of the cultural and ethnological heritage of Novalja, and within the museum is the entrance to the ancient aqueduct, which stretches all the way to the Novalja fields. The unique ancient aqueduct was carved out into solid rock in the 1st century. The most valuable finding which is kept in the City Museum is a wooden anchor from the 1st or 2nd century.

Particularly interesting for divers is the site with the remains of a merchant ship carrying amphorae from the first century BC, that sunk on the eastern coast of the island of Pag.